Bearing replacement

Main bearings replacement:

After watching Mondo Enduro and seeing a front wheel bearing collapse in the middle of nowhere, it seemed sensible to pull out all of the consumables and replace them for new ones. Although the bikes have only done around 4000 miles, it seemed like a relatively cheap job in relation to the comfort it will bring knowing I’m on new bearings.
Back in the Old chaps mechanics, I set to work with the two Old Mechanics (my Dad and his mate Paul) and began stripping the bike down. The mission for the day; replace the following:

Front wheel, rear wheel, swing Arm & linkage bearings.

All replacement bearings were replaced using All Balls Bearings. I struggled to get any solid answers from people with regards to which are the best bearings to use so we took a chance with these guys. I’ll update this post if I learn anything more further down the line. Having the two old boys on board has proved priceless for this trip. Between them I’m convinced they know everything there is to know about bikes and my Dads garage contains every tool under the sun. It made our days work so much more straight forward. The picture below is one of the few I took of the bike prior to all the mods being applied.
The two old mechanics.


Once stripped down, we noticed a minor seizure on one of the link arm bearings. Our guess is that it was probably caused by the bike being pressure hosed at some point and water being forced through the seal. After popping the seals on the bearings I was pretty shocked at the lack of grease present from the factory.
On the adivice of Alec at Core Racing, a water proof grease from Bel Ray was used to pack out the bearings which should hopefully make them even more resistant to issues along the way.  This stuff is much thicker than anything I have worked with before but apparently it’s used in under water pumps so I’m hoping it will withstand a few muddy Mongolian puddles.
It was quickly evident that the bearings were not going to come out without a little struggle but applying a heat gun to the area in question made small work of the job in hand.

Once the bike was fully stripped down, it was evident that some minor rust had set in to the frame. I had read a few stories on various sites about the DRZ frame not being hugely strong so we wanted to put a stop to that before I left the U.K. The brown substance you can see on the picture below is a rust proventitive product. Once set, it will be painted over again the same colour as the frame.

Once the bike was fully stripped down, it was evident that some minor rust had set in to the frame. I had read a few stories on various sites about the DRZ frame not being hugely strong so we wanted to put a stop to that before I left the U.K. The brown substance you can see on the picture below is a rust proventitive product. Once set, it will be painted over again the same colour as the frame.

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